Seizures : Emergency Room

Seizures : Emergency Room

Contrary to popular belief, many patients are misdiagnosed with seizures when in fact they have panic attacks. Seizures can be very debilitating and it is important that doctors are correctly diagnosing these patients. For example, seizure medications often have negative side effects. If a patient is having panic attacks instead of seizures, treatment for anxiety could help alleviate symptoms without any complications from medications. Urgent care centers offer more direct support for patients than hospitals and can treat them in a timely manner rather than wait on long lines of people who all need immediate attention. There has been evidence that suggests even with hospital-grade equipment, emergency rooms misdiagnose 10% of all cases they see.

If you are seizing, get yourself or a loved one to an emergency room as soon as possible. A seizure itself doesn’t mean you should go straight to an ER—especially if you already know it’s epilepsy and your doctor has said there’s nothing that can be done until your next appointment. (That said, seizures shouldn’t be taken lightly. They can lead to serious injury.) If your first seizure is accompanied by confusion, difficulty moving, a high fever or lethargy and you have no history of seizures or epilepsy, call 911 immediately. Also seek urgent care if you feel like you are going into another seizure but aren’t able to make it out of bed/your home due to fear of injuring yourself.

Some people believe that if you witness a seizure, you should take someone experiencing one directly to an emergency room. This can be dangerous for several reasons: First, it’s unlikely that doctors in an ER will have any experience dealing with seizures (there aren’t many cases of them). Second, even if a doctor does decide to treat a seizure immediately with medication or other interventions, they may not know how much medication is too much—putting your loved one at risk of injury. Third, many hospitals will give priority treatment (and scarce resources) to those who appear most ill and/or injured—even when another patient has more urgent needs. When medical professionals are busy treating someone who arrived first, they may overlook others who are in greater need.

Fever with a rash : Emergency Room

Fever with a rash : Emergency Room

As your mom always told you, it’s OK to have a fever. If you have a fever with a rash and a headache, though, head for urgent care or see your doctor. It’s probably just an allergic reaction—and not an infection or virus—but you should get checked out. For example, antibiotics won’t work on most non-viral infections; they will only make you feel better by killing off your body’s good bacteria that normally fight infections.

If you have a fever and a rash, chances are good that it’s just from an allergy. There’s no need to go immediately to an emergency room (ER)—you can call your doctor for advice or visit an urgent care center instead. While waiting for medical attention, drink plenty of water, sleep and take ibuprofen or acetaminophen if your body is in pain or has a fever. Above all else, avoid aspirin, which could lead to Reye’s syndrome if you have viral illness.

If you have a high fever and a rash, your emergency room doctor will probably tell you to go to urgent care. Why? Because some of these rashes can actually be dangerous if not properly diagnosed and treated in an urgent care facility (and may require antibiotics). If you do get an ER-style rash exam, doctors may take scrapings from your skin with a tool called a dermatome. However, even if they don’t scrape your skin, you’ll still leave with a diagnosis.

If you have a high fever and are running a temperature of 100.4°F or higher, especially if you’re also experiencing headaches and muscle aches, it’s best to seek emergency care right away. This is especially true if you’re showing signs of dehydration: dry mouth, excessive thirst, small amounts of dark yellow urine or dizziness when standing up. This can be a sign that your fever has caused your body to release too much water through urination. Fever with chest pain: If you have sudden chest pain that comes on suddenly and with little warning, or chest pain that lasts for longer than one hour when coughing or breathing deeply—or anytime at all without an obvious cause—you should head for urgent care instead of an emergency room.

Broken bones and dislocated joints : Emergency Room

Broken bones and dislocated joints : Emergency Room

If you’re confused, disoriented or experiencing a head injury (even if there is no visible wound), it’s probably best not to wait in an ER. Head trauma has symptoms that mimic many other conditions, so it can be difficult for ER staff (who may have limited experience with evaluating such patients) to figure out what’s really going on. For example, confusion and dizziness could indicate a minor concussion, but could also point toward more serious causes like stroke or meningitis. If you suspect head trauma, it may be better—and faster—to visit urgent care.

The urgent care center is equipped to deal with more acute, short-term health issues than an emergency room. For example, if you’re suffering from a concussion or confusion—two symptoms of a stroke—an urgent care facility is better equipped and more appropriate than an ER. Additionally, if you’re just not sure if you should go to an emergency room or urgent care facility, it’s smart to first visit your primary physician. He or she can perform a medical assessment and let you know whether or not you should go immediately in for treatment or wait until morning for your regular appointment. Most urgent care facilities are open 24 hours per day, which means even after normal business hours, they’ll be available for those who need them most.

Just because you might have suffered a concussion or are having trouble thinking clearly doesn’t mean you need to go to an emergency room. Many urgent care facilities, such as Citrus Health Urgent Care Centers, offer CT scans, so you can get checked out right away and get some rest. And if it turns out that your symptoms weren’t caused by a head injury at all but by food poisoning or a sinus infection—or any number of non-emergency ailments—you won’t be put on an expensive bill for services you don’t need. After all, hospital bills can cost thousands of dollars, even with insurance! Make sure you know what tests and services your policy covers before seeking medical attention.