Fever with a rash : Emergency Room

Fever with a rash : Emergency Room

As your mom always told you, it’s OK to have a fever. If you have a fever with a rash and a headache, though, head for urgent care or see your doctor. It’s probably just an allergic reaction—and not an infection or virus—but you should get checked out. For example, antibiotics won’t work on most non-viral infections; they will only make you feel better by killing off your body’s good bacteria that normally fight infections.

If you have a fever and a rash, chances are good that it’s just from an allergy. There’s no need to go immediately to an emergency room (ER)—you can call your doctor for advice or visit an urgent care center instead. While waiting for medical attention, drink plenty of water, sleep and take ibuprofen or acetaminophen if your body is in pain or has a fever. Above all else, avoid aspirin, which could lead to Reye’s syndrome if you have viral illness.

If you have a high fever and a rash, your emergency room doctor will probably tell you to go to urgent care. Why? Because some of these rashes can actually be dangerous if not properly diagnosed and treated in an urgent care facility (and may require antibiotics). If you do get an ER-style rash exam, doctors may take scrapings from your skin with a tool called a dermatome. However, even if they don’t scrape your skin, you’ll still leave with a diagnosis.

If you have a high fever and are running a temperature of 100.4°F or higher, especially if you’re also experiencing headaches and muscle aches, it’s best to seek emergency care right away. This is especially true if you’re showing signs of dehydration: dry mouth, excessive thirst, small amounts of dark yellow urine or dizziness when standing up. This can be a sign that your fever has caused your body to release too much water through urination. Fever with chest pain: If you have sudden chest pain that comes on suddenly and with little warning, or chest pain that lasts for longer than one hour when coughing or breathing deeply—or anytime at all without an obvious cause—you should head for urgent care instead of an emergency room.