Head or eye injury : Emergency Room

Head or eye injury : Emergency Room

If you have a head or eye injury, it’s usually better to go straight to an urgent care center. Urgent care centers often employ physicians specifically trained in emergency medicine, who can determine whether you need an MRI, CT scan or other tests that may be needed for a head or eye injury. Whereas many hospitals don’t have imaging capabilities on-site. If there’s a significant risk of permanent vision loss, don’t risk waiting at an emergency room that might not be able to provide these services when you need them most.

If you’ve got a headache or any other discomfort in your head or eye, you don’t need to make an appointment at the ER. Hospitals are not equipped to treat headaches, so there is no way they can provide immediate relief. If you’re suffering from a moderate headache, consider calling your doctor first or taking over-the-counter pain medication such as ibuprofen and acetaminophen. Be sure not mix these with alcohol, which will make both of them more potent and potentially dangerous. Never take aspirin if you have a head injury. Aspirin thins your blood and hinders clotting; in case of bleeding after injury, it could even be fatal.

If you have head or eye pain with blurred vision, try to avoid driving and go straight to urgent care or an emergency room. These are signs of serious injury that need immediate attention. However, if you have a headache, but your vision is clear and you’re not having any difficulty walking around and responding normally, it’s probably safe for you to drive yourself. Just don’t forget about your appointment!

Accidents, especially those that cause trauma or cuts, can sometimes make you believe you’re hurt worse than you actually are. But head and eye injuries can be very serious, so if your eyesight is blurry, your head hurts more than it should or you think you may have a concussion (you’re dizzy, disoriented or confused), go to an urgent care center instead of a hospital. It’s also important not to remove any objects from your eyes—especially foreign objects such as fish hooks—until after you see a doctor. At an urgent care facility, doctors will be able to tell if an object needs medical attention and will make sure not to push any objects into your eye further.