Seizures

Seizures

Don’t try to handle a seizure on your own. If you see someone having one, call 911 right away. While you wait for paramedics to arrive, make sure they’re safe by turning them onto their side and putting something soft under their head. Try not to place anything in their mouth (such as a spoon). Unless instructed otherwise by emergency responders, stay with them until they recover. They may feel embarrassed, but remember: Their safety is paramount! Offer reassurance that everything will be OK – it usually is!

At an urgent care center, you’ll receive quick attention from a board-certified doctor. An urgent care clinic also can provide an electrocardiogram (EKG) to look for irregular heartbeats, as well as X-rays and other tests if needed. With prompt diagnosis and treatment, your odds of a full recovery are good. And unlike in most hospitals, medical assistants at an urgent care center can take your blood pressure and give you a flu shot. If necessary, you also may be able to have minor surgery at an urgent care facility. It is not uncommon for urgent care centers to have agreements with area hospitals that allow physicians from one facility to perform procedures in another on a short-term basis.

They can look like fainting, a sudden loss of consciousness, prolonged muscle contractions and abnormal movements. But they’re also associated with symptoms specific to your brain—vomiting, incontinence, tingling in your face and arms. Seizures can be hard to diagnose but it’s important because they may indicate a serious underlying condition like epilepsy. If you have unexplained seizures or a family history of epilepsy, you should talk to your doctor immediately. Visit Urgent Care for immediate treatment if you experience: Seizures; Chest Pain/Difficulty Breathing; Choking; Stroke Symptoms such as paralysis on one side of your body; Dizziness accompanied by confusion or slurred speech.