Swelling lips, difficulty swallowing or breathing: the severe allergic reaction

Swelling lips, difficulty swallowing or breathing: the severe allergic reaction

Anyone can develop an allergic reaction, even if they’ve been prone to allergies in the past. Also called an anaphylactic reaction, this severe allergic reaction can be life-threatening if not treated immediately with epinephrine (a type of medication used to treat anaphylaxis). In this article, we’ll discuss the symptoms of swelling lips, difficulty swallowing or breathing, as well as how to treat it and what you should do if someone experiences swelling lips and difficulty swallowing or breathing symptoms.

Step 1
First of all, if you are experiencing a severe allergic reaction (swelling lips, difficulty swallowing or breathing) then call 911. To help prevent this from happening in the future, it is important to identify what you are allergic to and learn how to avoid it. If possible, bring a sample with you on your next doctor’s appointment.

Consequences of an allergic reaction
Anaphylaxis is a serious and sometimes life-threatening allergic reaction. It can be difficult to detect anaphylaxis because symptoms may not occur right away. In addition, anaphylaxis is often mistaken for other diseases such as asthma or food poisoning. Anaphylaxis occurs when the body reacts to a foreign substance (allergen) by releasing large amounts of histamine into blood vessels and tissues.

Prevention of a severe allergic reaction
If you are experiencing symptoms of a severe allergic reaction (swelling lips, difficulty swallowing or breathing), it is important to seek medical attention as soon as possible. If you have an epinephrine auto-injector available, use it and follow the instructions on the side of its box. Epinephrine can reduce swelling and lower your risk of death by 80%.
Epinephrine auto-injectors expire after three years.